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lebjohnson Silver Note Writer [C: 9 W: 0 N: 16] (92) [2009-12-22 6:38]

I love the little starbursts in the icicles, a natural Holiday decoration against the darkness of the trees. This is very well seen, and, even more, well captured.

Regards,
Lois

lebjohnson Silver Note Writer [C: 9 W: 0 N: 16] (92) [2009-12-21 7:53] [comment]

Hi Michael, Your snow looks as if it was wetter than what I got further north in Delaware. Unfortunately your photo doesn't give an idea of how much you got. Did the storm look like this? We got a total of 26 inches before it was through.
Regards,
Lois

lebjohnson Silver Note Writer [C: 9 W: 0 N: 16] (92) [2009-11-26 20:09]

Hello Marcelo,
This is very unusual fungi, photographed so that it has my full attention. Their clarity and color is amazing. Do you know what its species is?
Regards,
Lois
BTW By chance there are three fungi photos in a row. You imported the first, I the second and Ron the third!

lebjohnson Silver Note Writer [C: 9 W: 0 N: 16] (92) [2009-11-26 20:04]

And there are three mushrooms in a row on TN! It must be good fungus weather in a lot of places. It's certainly wet enough here. I like your photo of the Slippery Jack but it's missing one of the diagnostics of the species, the ring or annulus around its stem. Even without it, I agree that it's probably Suillus luteus as there aren't many mushrooms with that slippery looking brown cap, but, like you, I wouldn't eat it.
Regards.
Lois

lebjohnson Silver Note Writer [C: 9 W: 0 N: 16] (92) [2009-07-13 9:02]

This is a very nice photo of an extremely invasive species, beautifully positioned across the frame in the sharpest detail.

This variety of Phragmites is an introduced species into Delaware Bay and its tidal tributaries where it crowds out native species. It was introduced to the Delaware area in about 1920 as a control to erosion with no thought to its effect on the native ecosystem. It is such a problem that the state of Delaware offers to share the cost of its control with private landowners.

Best regards,
Lois

lebjohnson Silver Note Writer [C: 9 W: 0 N: 16] (92) [2009-07-06 6:40]

LOL, just like the children's book. This is a nice urban wildlife shot.
Regards,
Lois

lebjohnson Silver Note Writer [C: 9 W: 0 N: 16] (92) [2009-07-05 20:40] [+]

This is a lovely delicately colored image of a feeding Rosefinch, who posed for you most cooperatively. I have a comment and a question. The comment is that sharpness is sometimes a function of the computer screen the photo is being viewed on, and with my computer, the sharpness is acceptable. The question is, why are your many of your photos taken at ISO 800? I prefer to use a lower ISO whenever possible to lower of background noise.

Best regards,
Lois

lebjohnson Silver Note Writer [C: 9 W: 0 N: 16] (92) [2009-06-01 8:30]

Hi Michael,
You have photographed a colorful wet mosaic that just happens to be leaves. I like the contrast with the rock. Well seen.

Regards,
Lois

lebjohnson Silver Note Writer [C: 9 W: 0 N: 16] (92) [2009-05-31 18:35]

Hi Michael,

This is a well composed photo of a beautiful waterfall, a true scenic attraction. I can almost feel the spray.

Regards,
Lois

lebjohnson Silver Note Writer [C: 9 W: 0 N: 16] (92) [2009-05-28 7:18]

Hello from Wisconsin!
Yes, this definitely is a WOL (Pooh Bear's owl) tree with Virginia creeper cloaking its fall into decay. I'm glad you didn't try to climb it!

The upward line of the tree makes for a good composition, and the subdued colors give a thoughtful mood. It would be interesting to see this on a sunny day, but that doesn't always happen when we have time to photograph.

Best regards,
Lois