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Caring Baboons!!!


Caring Baboons!!!
Photo Information
Copyright: Sujoy Bhawal (sujoybhawal) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Note Writer [C: 70 W: 0 N: 406] (2181)
Genre: Animals
Medium: Color
Date Taken: 2010-12-21
Categories: Mammals
Camera: Canon 7D
Exposure: f/4.5, 1/160 seconds
More Photo Info: [view]
Photo Version: Original Version
Date Submitted: 2011-01-10 8:25
Viewed: 2784
Points: 2
[Note Guidelines] Photographer's Note
What a sight!! While passing through one of the national reserves in Kenya, have come across such a caring mammals.

Baboons are African and Asian Old World monkeys belonging to the genus Papio. There are five species, which are some of the largest non-hominid members of the primate order; only the Mandrill and the Drill are larger. Previously, the closely related Gelada and two species of Mandrill and Drill were grouped in the same genus, and these Old World monkeys are still often referred to as baboons in everyday speech. They range in size and weight depending on species. The Guinea Baboon is 50 cm (20 inches) and weighs only 14 kg (30 lb) while the largest Chacma Baboon can be 120 cm (47 inches) and weigh 40 kg (90 lb). A group of baboons is collectively called a troop or congress.

Baboons are terrestrial (ground dwelling) and are found in open savannah, open woodland and hills across Africa. Their diet is omnivorous, but mostly vegetarian; yet they eat insects and occasionally prey on fish, shellfish, hares, birds, vervet monkeys, and small antelopes. They are foragers and are active at irregular times throughout the day and night. They can raid human dwellings and in South Africa they have been known to prey on sheep and goats.

Their principal predators are humans, the lion, both the spotted and striped hyenas and the leopard for babies, although they are tough prey for a leopard and large males will often confront them by flashing their eyelids, showing their teeth by yawning, making gestures, and chasing after the intruder/predator.

Baboons in captivity have been known to live up to 45 years, while in the wild their life expectancy is about 30 years.

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  • zetu Gold Star Critiquer/Silver Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 967 W: 26 N: 3888] (16941)
  • [2011-01-10 11:03]

Hello Sujoy
Very nice! Thanks for sharing
Razvan

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