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Dangerous


Dangerous
Photo Information
Copyright: Farid Radjouh (ridfa) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Note Writer [C: 89 W: 0 N: 376] (4111)
Genre: Animals
Medium: Color
Date Taken: 2007-05
Categories: Birds
Camera: Canon EOS Mark II N, Canon 600 mm f/4 L IS USM, Compact Flash Card
Exposure: f/4, 1/320 seconds
Photo Version: Original Version, Workshop
Date Submitted: 2007-10-13 22:12
Viewed: 3920
Points: 9
[Note Guidelines] Photographer's Note
The Saddle-billed Stork (Ephippiorhynchus senegalensis) is a large wading bird in the stork family, Ciconiidae. It is a widespread species which is a resident breeder in sub-Saharan Africa from Sudan, Ethiopia and Kenya south to South Africa, and in The Gambia, Senegal, Côte d'Ivoire and Chad in west Africa.
This is a close relative of the widespread Asian Black-necked Stork, the only other member of the genus Ephippiorhynchus.
The Saddle-billed Stork breeds in marshes and other wetlands in tropical lowland. It builds a large, deep stick nest in a tree, laying one or two white eggs weighing about 146g each. It does not form breeding colonies, and is usually found alone or in pairs. The incubation period is 30-35 days, with another 70 - 100 days before the chicks fledge.
This is a huge bird that regularly attains a height of 150 cm (5 feet) and a 270cm (9 feet) wingspan. The male is larger and heavier than the female, with a range of 5.1-7.5 kg, the female is usually between 5 and 6.9 kg. It is probably the tallest, if not the heaviest, of the storks. Females are distinctly smaller than the males. It is spectacularly plumaged. The head, neck, back, wings, and tail are iridescent black, with the rest of the body and the primary flight feathers being white. The massive bill is red with a black band and a yellow frontal shield (the “saddle”). The legs and feet are black with pink knees. Sexes are identically plumaged except that the female has a golden yellow iris, while the male's is brown. Juveniles are browner grey in plumage.
They are silent except for bill-clattering at the nest. Like most storks, these fly with the neck outstretched, not retracted like a heron; in flight, the large heavy bill is kept drooping somewhat below belly height, giving these birds a very unusual appearance to those who see them for the first time. To experienced birdwatchers on the other hand, this makes them easily recognizable even if seen from a distance. It has been suggested that due to the large size and unusual appearance in flight, this species is the basis for the "Big Bird" and Kongamato cryptids.
The Saddle-billed Stork, like most of its relatives, feeds mainly on fish, frogs and crabs, but also on young birds, and other land vertebrates. They move in a deliberate and stately manner as they hunt, in a similar way to the larger herons.

Kathleen, pablominto, thor68, ferranjlloret, pirate, elizabeth has marked this note useful
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Discussions
ThreadThread Starter Messages Updated
To Kathleen: Toshopridfa 1 10-13 22:56
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Critiques [Translate]

Hi Farid.
I'll adjust my comments about no notes as I see you have now added them, thankyou, I had no idea what this bird was.
Perfect timing on his catch, well seen and captured with great detail.
Looks as if your levels need a slight adjustment on the lighter end of your histogram, slight grey cast on my screen. I'll check it out in photoshop for you, as always, it is an individual preference.
Great shot,


Kathleen

Hello Farid,
Interesting action has been captured, well done!
Hopefully the bird knows what he is doing...
Image is well composed, and the bird with the colourful beak stands out well...
Greetings,
Pablo -

:-) OK-

Hi Farid,
A very good photography! the moment just. Very good and interesting explanation
Salutacions
Ferran

Hi Farid
great action shot with nice colours and good compo although a bit pity to cut the stork's tail, but great capture!
tfs
tom

some tiny nits as the truncated tail of the bird. But action, timing and rarity of the scene is everything here. What a nice catch. The open mouth of the snake is a plus.
also very detailed
TFS
JM

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