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Assassin Bug


Assassin Bug
Photo Information
Copyright: Vishal Sabharwal (shal) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 256 W: 64 N: 481] (2140)
Genre: Animals
Medium: Color
Date Taken: 2007-04-17
Categories: Insects
Camera: Nikon D200, Nikkor 28-105mm f/3.5-4.5 D, UV Filter
Exposure: f/14.0, 1/60 seconds
Details: (Fill) Flash: Yes
More Photo Info: [view]
Photo Version: Original Version
Date Submitted: 2007-05-04 16:03
Viewed: 4073
Points: 8
[Note Guidelines] Photographer's Note
Reduviidae is a large, cosmopolitan family of predatory insects in the suborder Heteroptera. It includes assassin bugs (genera include Melanolestes, Psellipus, Rasahus, Reduvius, Rhiginia, Sinea, Triatoma, and Zelus), wheel bugs (Arilus cristatus), ambush bugs (genera include Apiomerus and Phymata), and thread-legged bugs (the subfamily Emesinae, including the genus Emesaya). There are about 7000 species altogether, making it one of the largest families in the Hemiptera.

Physical characteristics

Adult bugs often range from 4 to 40 mm. They most commonly have an elongated head with a distinct narrowed neck, long legs, and a prominent, segmented "beak" (proboscis). Most species are dark in color with hues of brown, black, red, or orange. The most distinctive feature of the family is that the tip of the proboscis fits into a groove in the prosternum, where it is rasped against ridges there to produce sound (a stridulitrum).

Feeding

They use the long proboscis to inject a lethal saliva that liquefies the insides of the prey, which are then sucked out. The legs of some of these bugs are covered in tiny hairs that serve to make them sticky to hold onto their prey while they feed. The saliva is commonly effective at killing substantially larger prey than the bug itself. As nymphs, some species will cover and camouflage themselves with debris, or the remains of dead prey insects.

Some species have been known to feed on cockroaches or bedbugs (in the case of the masked hunter) and are regarded in many locations as beneficial. Some people breed them as pets and for insect control.
Source:Wikipedia

nglen, deblink, anel has marked this note useful
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Critiques [Translate]

  • Great 
  • batu Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 1079 W: 293 N: 4497] (16383)
  • [2007-05-04 16:48]

Hello Vishal,
great depth of field to show most parts of the bug in pretty good sharpness. The selected point of view is very suitable out of the same reason.
Best wishes, Peter

  • Great 
  • nglen Gold Star Critiquer/Silver Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 2883 W: 30 N: 9683] (36145)
  • [2007-05-04 18:11]

Hi Vishal. A very good macro shot. great detail and rich colours with good light. and a nice POv
well done. TFS
Nick

Hi Vishal,
Thank goodness humans aren't included in their food chain. I feel a little sorry for their prey. Excellent macro image, of extremely good quality. Nice.
Cheers,
Debbie

  • Great 
  • anel Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Note Writer [C: 3053 W: 3 N: 8715] (40574)
  • [2007-05-06 3:58]

Hello Vishal,
Excellent picture of this assassin bug which you took with great sharpness. Good composition too. Thank's also for the note.
Best regards
Anne

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