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Millipede


Millipede
Photo Information
Copyright: vipin baliga (vipinbaliga) Silver Star Critiquer/Silver Workshop Editor/Silver Note Writer [C: 18 W: 12 N: 44] (460)
Genre: Animals
Medium: Color
Date Taken: 2009-06-27
Categories: Insects
Camera: Nokia N73
Exposure: f/3.2
More Photo Info: [view]
Photo Version: Final Version, Original Version
Date Submitted: 2010-03-26 5:13
Viewed: 2911
Points: 4
[Note Guidelines] Photographer's Note
This picture was captured with my Nokia N73.

Location:
Aimangala Village,
Virajpet Taluk,
S-Kodagu.

Information on the Specimen:

Millipedes range from 2 to 280 millimetres (0.079 to 11.0 in) in length, and can have as few as eleven, to over a hundred segments. They are generally black or brown in colour, although there are few brightly coloured species.

Millipedes are arthropods that have two pairs of legs per segment (except for the first segment behind the head which does not have any appendages at all, and the next few which only have one pair of legs).

Millipedes breathe through two pairs of spiracles on each diplosegment. Each opens into an internal pouch, and connects to a system of tracheae. The heart runs the entire length of the body, with an aorta stretching into the head. The excretory organs are two pairs of malpighian tubules, located near the mid-part of the gut.

The head contains a pair of sensory organs known as the Tömösváry organs. These are found just posterior and lateral to the antennae, and are shaped as small and oval rings at the base of the antennae. They are probably used to measure the humidity in the surroundings, and they may have some chemoreceptory abilities too. Millipede eyes consist of a number of simple flat lensed ocelli arranged in a group on the front/side of the head. Many species of millipedes, such as cave-dwelling millipedes, have secondarily lost their eyes

Having many short legs makes millipedes rather slow, but they are powerful burrowers. With their legs and body length moving in a wavelike pattern, they easily force their way underground head first. They also seem to have some engineering ability, reinforcing the tunnel by rearranging the particles around it.Their bodies have segmented sections which makes them move in a wave-like form.

Millipedes are detritivores and slow moving. Most millipedes eat decaying leaves and other dead plant matter, moisturising the food with secretions and then scraping it in with the jaws.
A few species are omnivorous or carnivorous, and may prey on small arthropods, such as insects and centipedes, or on earthworms. Some species have piercing mouthparts that allow them to feed on plant juices

The giant African millipede (Archispirostreptus gigas) is the largest species of millipede.

Defence Mechanisms:

Due to their lack of speed and their inability to bite or sting, millipedes' primary defense mechanism is to curl into a tight coil — protecting their delicate legs inside an armoured body exterior. Many species also emit poisonous liquid secretions or hydrogen cyanide gas through microscopic pores along the sides of their bodies as a secondary defense. Some of these substances are caustic and can burn the exoskeleton of ants and other insect predators, and the skin and eyes of larger predators.


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Critiques [Translate]

  • Great 
  • roges Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Note Writer [C: 957 W: 0 N: 1329] (6264)
  • [2010-03-26 5:29]

Hi Vipin,
a very interesting shot.
An excellent macro, with a very interesting BG.
Nice contrast of colors with a well chosen POV.
Have a nice WE,
Adrian

wow
impressive shape and color
reminds me of train in underground railway

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