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Great White Shark


Great White Shark
Photo Information
Copyright: Kaustubh Wadekar (kaustubh0072) (54)
Genre: Animals
Medium: Color
Date Taken: 2008-04-07
Categories: Fish
Camera: Nikon Coolpix S10
Exposure: f/3.5, 1/60 seconds
More Photo Info: [view]
Photo Version: Original Version
Date Submitted: 2008-07-08 22:13
Viewed: 4593
Points: 0
[Note Guidelines] Photographer's Note
The great white shark, Carcharodon carcharias, also known as white pointer, white shark, or white death, is an exceptionally large lamniform shark found in coastal surface waters in all major oceans.

Reaching lengths of more than 6 m (20 ft) and weighing up to 2,250 kg (5,000 lb), the great white shark is the world's largest known predatory fish. It is the only surviving species of its genus, Carcharodon.

The great white is classified as a mackerel (Lamnidae) shark. There are four other living species in this family, two mako and two Lamna sharks.

Great white sharks live in almost all coastal and offshore waters which have a water temperature of between 12 and 24 C (54 to 75 F), with greater concentrations off the southern coasts of Australia, off South Africa, California, Mexico's Isla Guadalupe and to a degree in the Central Mediterranean and Adriatic Seas. One of the densest known populations is found around Dyer Island, South Africa where much research on the shark is conducted. It can be also found in tropical waters like those of the Caribbean, and has been recorded off Mauritius.

It is an epipelagic fish, but recorded or observed mostly in coastal waters in the presence of rich game like fur seals, sea lions, cetaceans, other sharks and large bony fish species. It is considered an open-ocean dweller and is recorded from the surface down to depths of 1,280 m (4,200 ft), but is most often found close to the surface.

In a recent study great white sharks from California were shown to migrate to an area between Baja California and Hawaii, where they spend at least 100 days of the year before they migrate back to Baja. On the journey out, they swim slowly and dive down to around 900 m (3,000 ft). After they arrive, they change behaviour and do short dives to about 300 m (980 ft) for up to 10 minutes. It is still unknown why they migrate and what they do there; it might be seasonal feeding or possibly a mating area.

More about it in my next posting.


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