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Jaguar


Jaguar
Photo Information
Copyright: JeanMarie Mouveroux (Nephrotome2) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 599 W: 60 N: 660] (2538)
Genre: Animals
Medium: Color
Date Taken: 2013-01-03
Categories: Mammals
Camera: Canon EOS 50D, Canon 70-200mm f/ 2.8 L IS USM, (digital)
Exposure: f/2.8, 1/200 seconds
More Photo Info: [view]
Photo Version: Original Version
Date Submitted: 2013-01-11 8:36
Viewed: 2276
Points: 2
[Note Guidelines] Photographer's Note
Jaguar (EN, NL, FR)
Panthera onca (Lat)

The jaguar is a feline in the Panthera genus, and is the only Panthera species found in the Americas. The jaguar is the third-largest feline after the tiger and the lion, and the largest in the Western Hemisphere. The jaguar's present range extends from Southern United States and Mexico across much of Central America and south to Paraguay and northern Argentina. Apart from a known and possibly breeding population in Arizona (southeast of Tucson), the cat has largely been extirpated from the United States since the early 20th century.
This spotted cat most closely resembles the leopard physically, although it is usually larger and of sturdier build and its behavioural and habitat characteristics are closer to those of the tiger. While dense rainforest is its preferred habitat, the jaguar will range across a variety of forested and open terrains. It is strongly associated with the presence of water and is notable, along with the tiger, as a feline that enjoys swimming. The jaguar is largely a solitary, opportunistic, stalk-and-ambush predator at the top of the food chain. The jaguar has an exceptionally powerful bite, even relative to the other big cats. This allows it to pierce the shells of armoured reptiles and to employ an unusual killing method: it bites directly through the skull of prey between the ears to deliver a fatal bite to the brain. The jaguar is a near threatened species and its numbers are declining. Threats include loss and fragmentation of habitat. While international trade in jaguars or their parts is prohibited, the cat is still frequently killed by humans, particularly in conflicts with ranchers and farmers in South America.The base coat of the jaguar is generally a tawny yellow, but can range to reddish-brown and black, for most of the body. However the ventral areas are white. While the jaguar closely resembles the leopard, it is sturdier and heavier, and the two animals can be distinguished by their rosettes: the rosettes on a jaguar's coat are larger, fewer in number, usually darker, and have thicker lines and small spots in the middle that the leopard lacks. Jaguars also have rounder heads and shorter, stockier limbs compared to leopards.A near-black melanistic form occurs regularly. Jaguars with melanism appear entirely black, although their spots are still visible on close examination. The black morph is at about six percent of the population.


The one on the shot is no black morph. He's just dark. Shot at parc de Beauval.

Thanks for looking


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Critiques [Translate]

Jean-Marie,

The true "Fat Cat"!! Good pose. You might have decreased the amount of magentia and he would have appeared more natural, as would the wooden tree/log. Have a good day.

Mike

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