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Gaspeldoorn


Gaspeldoorn
Photo Information
Copyright: juliette gribnau (juliettegribnau) Silver Workshop Editor/Silver Note Writer [C: 1 W: 0 N: 32] (400)
Genre: Plants
Medium: Color
Date Taken: 2014-11-23
Categories: Flowers
Camera: Olympus OMD M5, Olympus Digital 12x50mm, 1:5.3-6.3 EZ
Exposure: f/6.0, 1/320 seconds
More Photo Info: [view]
Photo Version: Original Version
Date Submitted: 2014-11-23 7:34
Viewed: 1111
Points: 0
[Note Guidelines] Photographer's Note
Common gorse

Common Gorse flowers
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Rosids
Order: Fabales
Family: Fabaceae
Subfamily: Faboideae
Genus: Ulex
Species: U. europaeus
Binomial name
Ulex europaeus
L.

Ulex europaeus (gorse, common gorse, furze or whin) is a species of flowering plant in the family Fabaceae, native to portions of Europe from the northern United Kingdom south to Galicia in Spain and Portugal, and from the western Republic of Ireland east to Galicja in Poland and Ukraine.

Growing to 23 metres (710 ft) tall, it is an evergreen shrub. The young stems are green, with the shoots and leaves modified into green spines, 13 centimetres (0.391.18 in) long. Young seedlings produce normal leaves for the first few months; these are trifoliate, resembling a small clover leaf.

The flowers are yellow, 12 centimetres (0.390.79 in) long, with the pea-flower structure typical of the Fabaceae; they are produced throughout the year, but mainly in early spring. The fruit is a legume (pod) 2 centimetres (0.79 in) long, dark purplish-brown, partly enclosed by the pale brown remnants of the flower; the pod contains 2-3 small blackish, shiny, hard seeds, which are ejected when the pod splits open in hot weather. Seeds remain viable for 30 years.

Like many species of gorse, it is often a fire-climax plant, which readily catches fire but re-grows from the roots after the fire; the seeds are also adapted to germinate after slight scorching by fire. It has a tap root, lateral and adventious roots. An extremely tough and hardy plant, it can live for about thirty years.


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