<< Previous Next >>

Glossy Ibis


Glossy Ibis
Photo Information
Copyright: Peter van Zoest (PeterZ) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 5136 W: 166 N: 13121] (49139)
Genre: Animals
Medium: Color
Date Taken: 2012-07-20
Categories: Birds
Camera: Nikon D300, Nikon AF-S 18-105mm F/3.5-5.6G VR ED DX, Digital RAW
Exposure: 1/500 seconds
Details: Tripod: Yes (Fill) Flash: Yes
More Photo Info: [view]
Photo Version: Original Version
Date Submitted: 2016-11-30 2:39
Viewed: 1831
Points: 12
[Note Guidelines] Photographer's Note
Last week I posted a photo of a Black Stork which wasn’t black. The Dutch name of a Glossy Ibis is Zwarte Ibis, Black Ibis in English. But this ibis isn’t black in full sunlight. Glossy Ibis is a better name.

The Glossy Ibis (Plegadis falcinellus) is a wading bird in the ibis family Threskiornithidae.

Distribution
This is the most widespread ibis species, breeding in scattered sites in warm regions of Europe, Asia, Africa, Australia, and the Atlantic and Caribbean region of the Americas. It is thought to have originated in the Old World and spread naturally from Africa to northern South America in the 19th century, from where it spread to North America. This species is migratory; most European birds winter in Africa, and in North America birds from north of the Carolinas winter farther south. Birds from other populations may disperse widely outside the breeding season. While generally declining in Europe it has recently established a breeding colony in Southern Spain, and there appears to be a growing trend for the Spanish birds to winter in Britain and Ireland, with at least 22 records in 2010.

Behaviour
Glossy Ibises undertake dispersal movements after breeding and are very nomadic. The more northerly populations are fully migratory and travel on a broad front, for example across the Sahara Desert. Populations in temperate regions breed during the local spring, while tropial populations nest to coincide with the rainy season. Nesting is often in mixed-species colonies. When not nesting flocks of over 100 individuals may occur on migration, and during the winter or dry seasons the species is usually found foraging in small flocks. Glossy Ibis often roosts communally at night in large flocks, with other species, occasionally in trees which can be some distance from wetland feeding areas.

Habitat
Glossy Ibis feed in very shallow water and nest in freshwater or brackish wetlands with tall dense stands of emergent vegetation such as reeds, papyrus or rushes) and low trees or bushes. They show a preference for marshes at the margins of lakes and rivers but can also be found at lagoons, flood-plains, wet meadows, swamps, reservoirs, sewage ponds, paddies and irrigated farmland. It is less commonly found in coastal locations such as estuaries, deltas, salt marshes and coastal lagoons. Preferred roosting sites are normally in large trees which may distant from the feeding areas.
The nests are usually a platform of twigs and vegetation positioned at least 1m above water, sometimes up to 7 m in tall, dense stands of emergent vegetation, low trees or bushes.

Diet
The diet of the Glossy Ibis is variable according to the season and is very dependent on what is available. Prey includes adult and larval insects such as aquatic beetles, dragonflies, damselflies, grasshoppers, crickets, flies and caddisflies, Annelida including leeches, molluscs (e.g. snails and mussels), crustaceans (e.g. crabs and crayfish) and occasionally fish, amphibians, lizards, small snakes and nestling birds.

Description
This species is 55–65 centimeters long with an 88–105 centimeters wingspan. Breeding adults have reddish-brown bodies and shiny bottle-green wings. Non-breeders and juveniles have duller bodies. This species has a brownish bill, dark facial skin bordered above and below in blue-gray (non-breeding) to cobalt blue (breeding), and red-brown legs. Unlike herons, ibises fly with necks outstretched, their flight being graceful and often in V-formation.
Sounds made by this rather quiet ibis include a variety of croaks and grunts, including a hoarse grrrr made when breeding.

Conservation
The Glossy Ibis is one of the species to which the Agreement on the Conservation of African-Eurasian Migratory Waterbirds (AEWA) applies. Glossy Ibises are threatened by wetland habitat degradation and loss through drainage, increased salinity, groundwater extraction and invasion by exotic plants. It is also threatened locally by hunting, disturbance and pesticides.

Source: Wikipedia

CeltickRanger, Hormon_Manyer has marked this note useful
Only registered TrekNature members may rate photo notes.
Add Critique [Critiquing Guidelines] 
Only registered TrekNature members may write critiques.
Discussions
None
You must be logged in to start a discussion.

Critiques [Translate]

Mooie scherpe opname Peter
de kleuren zijn super mooi te zien met veel details van de veren
pracht plaat
bedankt weer gr lou

  • Great 
  • lousat Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 6479 W: 89 N: 15610] (65303)
  • [2016-11-30 4:38]

Hi Peter,lovely capture of this ibis,the pose is perfect and the quality of the pic too despite the cloudy day,i like a lot the plumage colors,well done! Have a nice day and thanks,Luciano

Ciao Peter, great capture of lovely Ibis in nice pose, fine details, splendid sharpness and wonderful natural colors, very well done, my friend, ciao Silvio

Hello Peter,
Nice to see a well detailed picture of Glossy Ibis. Sharp picture. I have noticed here in South Africa Glossy Ibises neck looks bit reddish. Don't know why. Colours are well visible too.
Thanks for sharing,
Regards,
Srikumar

Hello Peter

Excellent photo of the Glossy Ibis with fine POV and framing,
excellent focus, sharpness, details, and contrast, TFS

Asbed

Hi Peter,
Same phenomenon as with the Black Stork - which isn't black at all in sunshine. Beautiful textures on the feathers, simple yet pleasant composition - what else should we wish? Yeah, your full return to TN. We miss you.
Kind regards from Ireland, László

Calibration Check
















0123456789ABCDEF