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I think I saw a fish...


I think I saw a fish...
Photo Information
Copyright: Ungureanu Liviu (Apashu) Silver Star Critiquer/Gold Note Writer [C: 15 W: 0 N: 126] (937)
Genre: Animals
Medium: Color
Date Taken: 2011-08-15
Categories: Birds
Exposure: f/5.6, 1/125 seconds
More Photo Info: [view]
Photo Version: Original Version
Date Submitted: 2011-08-17 2:32
Viewed: 2837
Points: 8
[Note Guidelines] Photographer's Note
The Mallard was one of the many bird species originally described by Linnaeus in his 18th century work, Systema Naturae, and still bears the first binomial name given to it.

The Mallard is the ancestor of almost all of the varieties of domestic ducks. Ducks belong to the subfamily Anatinae of the waterfowl family Anatidae. The wild Mallard and Muscovy duck (Cairina moschata) are believed to be the ancestors of all domestic ducks.

The name is derived from the Old French malart or mallart "wild drake", although its ultimate derivation is unclear. It may be related to an Old High German masculine proper name Madelhart, clues lying in the alternate English forms "maudelard" or "mawdelard".

Mallards frequently interbreed with their closest relatives in the genus Anas, such as the American Black Duck, and also with species more distantly related, for example the Northern Pintail, leading to various hybrids that may be fully fertile. This is quite unusual among different species, and apparently is because the Mallard evolved very rapidly and not too long ago, during the Late Pleistocene only. The distinct lineages of this radiation are usually kept separate due to non-overlapping ranges and behavioural cues, but are still not fully genetically incompatible. Mallards and their domesticated conspecifics are, of course, also fully interfertile.

Mallards appear to be closer to their Indo-Pacific relatives than to their American ones judging from biogeography. Considering mtDNA D-loop sequence data,[6] they may have evolved more probably than not in the general area of Siberia; Mallard bones rather abruptly appear in food remains of ancient humans and other deposits of fossil bones in Europe, without a good candidate for a local predecessor species[citation needed]. The large ice age paleosubspecies which made up at least the European and west Asian populations during the Pleistocene has been named Anas platyrhynchos palaeoboschas.

NinaM has marked this note useful
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Critiques [Translate]

  • Great 
  • NinaM Gold Star Critiquer [C: 773 W: 3 N: 1157] (4077)
  • [2011-08-17 7:29]

I like this one a lot...

I do not believe how this can have only two points thus far. It is fabulous!

Hi Apashu
Very particular photo, it seems a painting.
Good colours and detail.
Regards
Gianmaria

  • Great 
  • ana974 Gold Star Critiquer/Silver Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 477 W: 48 N: 968] (4857)
  • [2011-08-17 15:39]

Hello Apashu!
Great shot with lovely lightness and sharpness.Fabulous point of view!
Many congrats and thanks for sharing!
Regards from,
aNa

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