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Life after fire


Life after fire
Photo Information
Copyright: Jaume Pages Pinyol (jpages) (29)
Genre: Landscapes
Medium: Color
Date Taken: 2004-03-27
Categories: Fungi
Camera: Nikon F80
Photo Version: Original Version
Date Submitted: 2005-02-02 16:13
Viewed: 4855
Points: 5
[Note Guidelines] Photographer's Note
Stereum-hirsutum

This photo was token in a burned forest near “Sant Miquel del Fai”, a very pleasant place near Barcelona / Catalunya, were there is a water fall very unusual in this zone, and some ways to take a walk by the mountain (very recommended in weekend to avoid the stress)

During an excursion, we could see how the fire burned a very big region that before was full of trees, almost of them pines.
Over a burned trunk, I saw this variety of mushroom, and it impress me a lot, that after 2 years of the fire, this kind of live begins to grow again. Really beautiful.

I am not a mushroom expert, so I have been looking for witch kind of mushroom it is, and it may be: “Stereum-hirsutum“ (sorry if not, any help will be wellcome).

I found this info in:
http://www.mykoweb.com/CAF/species_index.html
(Very good page for mushroom lovers!)

Common Name: False Turkey Tail
• Sporocarp
Fruiting body annual or short-live perennial, resupinate when young, forming thin, leathery overlapping shelves at maturity, 1-3.5 cm wide and up to 8 cm long when fused with adjacent shelves; upper surface hairy, undulate, lobed, banded orange-brown to yellow-brown, older tissue grey to greyish-brown; lower fertile surface smooth, orange-buff to pale-buff, if zoned, less conspicuously than the upper surface; flesh 0.5-1.0 mm thick, pliant when young, tough in age; stalk absent.
• Spores
Spores 5.5-7 x 3-3.5 µm, cylindrical, smooth.
• Habitat
Fruiting in tiers and overlapping shelves on “dead hardwood stumps”, branches, etc., occasionally on conifer wood; fruiting throughout the mushroom season.
• Edibility
Inedible; too tough to be of culinary value.
• Comments
The small, wavy, leathery shelves of Stereum hirsutum are a common sight in Bay Area woodlands. Fresh fruitings are bright orange-brown to orange-buff, fading in age or dry weather to dull-buff or grey. As the common name suggests, Stereum hirsutum is sometimes confused with Trametes versicolor, the so called "true" Turkey Tail. The latter also has a banded upper surface, but is colored differently, usually a combination of grey, brown or cream, rarely with orange tones. More significantly, it has a pored, not smooth fertile surface. Lenzites betulina, another bracket fungus with a banded upper surface, differs in having a gill-like hymenium.

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To Sarcodon: Maybeż?jpages 2 04-28 04:10
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Critiques [Translate]

  • Good 
  • i-ball (21)
  • [2005-02-02 17:36]

Nice picture. I like the ppattern on the burnt wood and the contrasting colour of the fungus growing the black burnt wood

  • Great 
  • livios Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 2150 W: 319 N: 4263] (16942)
  • [2005-02-15 9:17]

Jaume, I've never managed to capture a similar picture.

I like this. Nice colors and POV. Good title and note.

I think it isn't Stereum hirsutum because it should have smooth hymenium. If you look down you can see 2 exemplarys with cap slightly upside down and we can see the hymenium; it seems to have gill or other structure.
I think it's probable this is Plicaturopsis crispa (Persoon) D.A. Reid 1964 (also the shape would be typical) or same similar specie.
What do you think about my idea?

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