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Snow Goose White & Blue Morph


Snow Goose White & Blue Morph
Photo Information
Copyright: Mario Olteanu (Mariol) Gold Star Critiquer/Silver Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 160 W: 15 N: 1654] (8221)
Genre: Animals
Medium: Color
Date Taken: 2013-03-17
Categories: Birds
Camera: Canon EOS 1D Mark IV, Canon 100-400L 4.5-5.6 IS USM
Exposure: f/5.6
More Photo Info: [view]
Photo Version: Original Version, Workshop
Date Submitted: 2013-03-18 18:55
Viewed: 2833
Points: 6
[Note Guidelines] Photographer's Note
A very rare sighting for my area less then 2 miles from my house. A huge flock of Tundra Swans (more then 300) in a mixed flock with Canada goose, ducks and probably 4 Snow goose one blue morph - a new bird species for me.

In Workshop a small part of the mixed flock
Done in Mississauga - Highwey 407 & Britania Road

The Snow Goose (Chen caerulescens), also known as the Blue Goose, is a North American species of goose. Its name derives from the typically white plumage.

The Snow Goose has two color plumage morphs, white (snow) or gray/blue (blue), thus the common description as "snows" and "blues." White-morph birds are white except for black wing tips, but blue-morph geese have bluish-grey plumage replacing the white except on the head, neck and tail tip. The immature blue phase is drab or slate-gray with little to no white on the head, neck, or belly. Both snow and blue phases have rose-red feet and legs, and pink bills with black tomia ("cutting edges"), giving them a black "grin patch." The colors are not as bright on the feet, legs, and bill of immature birds. The head can be stained rusty-brown from minerals in the soil where they feed. They are very vocal and can often be heard from more than a mile away.

White- and blue-morph birds interbreed and the offspring may be of either morph. These two colors of geese were once thought to be separate species; since they interbreed and are found together throughout their ranges, they are now considered two color phases of the same species. The color phases are genetically controlled. The dark phase results from a single dominant gene and the white phase is homozygous recessive. When choosing a mate, young birds will most often select a mate that resembles their parents' coloring. If the birds were hatched into a mixed pair, they will mate with either color phase.
(From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)


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Critiques [Translate]

A wonderful composition of these three different geese. clear and sharp. Like!
Pierre

Hi Mario. I know these geese have long legs. I'm surprised they are tucked in as well as they are. This is a remarkably clear picture showing the geese off very well. I like the framing and you were lucky enough to get a great blue sky for background. Beauty in the making. Well capture! TFS Trevor

你好
照的很清晰
鳥很可愛
還有的姿勢逗趣
構圖也美麗
謝謝分享
STONE

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