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White-tailed (Virginia) Deer


White-tailed (Virginia) Deer
Photo Information
Copyright: Michael Porterfield (mporterf) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 60 W: 74 N: 84] (673)
Genre: Animals
Medium: Color
Date Taken: 2011-06-14
Categories: Mammals
Camera: Canon EOS 40D, 28-135 IS f3.5-5.6
Exposure: f/5.6, 1/30 seconds
More Photo Info: [view]
Photo Version: Original Version
Date Submitted: 2011-06-15 4:09
Viewed: 2613
Points: 3
[Note Guidelines] Photographer's Note
The white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), also known as the Virginia deer or simply as the whitetail, is a medium-sized deer native to the United States (all but five of the states), Canada, Mexico, Central America, and in South America as far south as Peru. It has also been introduced to New Zealand and some countries in Europe, such as Finland and the Czech Republic.

The species is most common east of the Rocky Mountains, and is absent from much of the western United States, including Nevada, Utah, California, Hawaii, and Alaska (though its close relatives, the mule deer and black-tailed deer Odocoileus hemionus, can be found there). It does, however, survive in aspen parklands and deciduous river bottomlands within the central and northern Great Plains, and in mixed deciduous riparian corridors, river valley bottomlands, and lower foothills of the northern Rocky Mountain regions from South Dakota and Wyoming to southeastern British Columbia, including the Montana Valley and Foothill grasslands.

The conversion of land adjacent to the northern Rockies into agriculture use and partial clear-cutting of coniferous trees (resulting in widespread deciduous vegetation) has been favorable to the white-tailed deer and has pushed its distribution to as far north as Prince George, British Columbia. Populations of deer around the Great Lakes have also expanded their range northwards, due to conversion of land to agricultural uses favoring more deciduous vegetation, and local caribou and moose populations. The westernmost population of the species, known as the Columbian white-tailed deer, once was widespread in the mixed forests along the Willamette and Cowlitz River valleys of western Oregon and southwestern Washington, but today its numbers have been considerably reduced, and it is classified as near-threatened. The white-tailed deer is well-suited for its environment. [Wikipedia]

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Critiques [Translate]

Hi Michael,

the composition of this image would be good, but the details are not very sharp.However the figure stands out well from the BG, thanks to colours.At the present time i'm not able to give you technical totally correct advices, so i'll refrain from doing it.The photo would be nice, but for the sharpness issue i should wait for someone more strong in this subject.

Anyway TFS

Alessio

Michael,

Very nice capture of this fine white-tailed Deer, judging by the environment this is a small Deer, very cute and seems quite content, as regards the sharpness i would say that your shutter speed is too slow at 1/30th sec, if using this shutter speed use a tripod or up your exposure speed to say 100 + sec (if you have a steady hand) and let the camera do the rest, nevertheless a pleasing picture indeed,
Best regards and have a nice evening,

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