<< Previous Next >>

Australian Kookaburra


Australian Kookaburra
Photo Information
Copyright: Thomas Sautter (mjdundee) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Note Writer [C: 76 W: 0 N: 287] (1207)
Genre: Animals
Medium: Color
Date Taken: 1997-07
Categories: Birds
Camera: Minolta dynax 500si super, Minolta AF 24-85mm / 3.5 - 4.5
Details: (Fill) Flash: Yes
Photo Version: Original Version
Date Submitted: 2006-01-22 6:05
Viewed: 4206
Points: 2
[Note Guidelines] Photographer's Note
His german name is 'Lachender Hans' - laughing Hans.
This fits to his noisy and broad laughter voice sound.
He is a very social bird and always looks for a chance to pick some meat from the a BBQ at campgrounds in the forest - like here on the great sandy Fraser Island.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:

Kookaburras are very large terrestrial kingfishers native to Australia and New Guinea.

Kookaburras are best known for their unmistakable call which is uncannily like loud, echoing human laughter good-natured if rather hysterical merriment in the case of the well-known Laughing Kookaburra (Dacelo novaeguineae), maniacial, almost insane cackling in the case of the slightly smaller Blue-winged Kookaburra (Dacelo leachii). This sound is often used as background noise for movies set in jungles.

Kookaburras occupy woodland territories in loose family groups, and their laughter serves the same purpose as a great many other bird calls: to demarcate territorial borders. The Laughing Kookaburra also "laughs" to greet its mate after periods of absences. It can be heard at any time of day but most frequently shortly after dawn, and especially when the colour drains from the forest after sunset.

Kookaburras in the bushOne bird starts with a low, hiccupping chuckle, then throws its head back in raucous laughter: often several others join in. If a rival tribe is within earshot and replies, the whole family soon gathers to fill the bush with ringing laughter. Hearing kookaburras in full voice is one of the more extraordinary experiences of the Australian bush.

Kookaburras with lizard preyKookaburras hunt much as other kingfishers (or indeed robins) do: by perching on a convenient branch or wire and waiting patiently for prey to pass by: mice and similar-sized small mammals, large insects, lizards, small birds and nestlings, and most famously, snakes. Small prey are preferred, but kookaburras not infrequently take surprisingly large creatures, including venomous snakes a good deal longer than the bird itself.

Most species of Kookaburra tend to live in family units, with offspring helping the parents hunt and care for the next generation of offspring.

During mating season, the Laughing Kookaburra indulges in behaviour similar to that of a Wattle Bird. The female adopts a begging posture and vocalises like a young bird. The male then offers her his current catch accompanied with an "oo oo oo" sound. They start breeding around October/November. If the first clutch fails, they will continue breeding into the summer months.

The male Laughing Kookaburra can be easily distinguished from the female by the blue hues on his wing feathers and darker blue on his tail feathers. The female on the other hand has a small amount of aqua on her wing feathers, but no blue on her tail feathers.

dew77 has marked this note useful
Only registered TrekNature members may rate photo notes.
Add Critique [Critiquing Guidelines] 
Only registered TrekNature members may write critiques.
Discussions
None
You must be logged in to start a discussion.

Critiques [Translate]

  • Great 
  • dew77 Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 4432 W: 248 N: 4028] (13270)
  • [2006-01-22 11:19]

Hello Thomas!
Funny capture.POV,pose of bird,
framing,details and composition
are wonderful.TFS...:-)

Calibration Check
















0123456789ABCDEF