<< Previous Next >>

West Australian Magpie


West Australian Magpie
Photo Information
Copyright: Maurie Leeder (Maurie) Gold Star Critiquer/Silver Workshop Editor/Silver Note Writer [C: 0 W: 0 N: 10] (57)
Genre: Animals
Medium: Color
Date Taken: 2009-08-17
Categories: Birds
Camera: olympus E420, Zuiko 40-150mm f/4.0-5.6 Telephoto Zoom
Exposure: f/5.6, 1/180 seconds
More Photo Info: [view]
Photo Version: Original Version
Date Submitted: 2010-08-09 19:27
Viewed: 4750
Points: 2
[Note Guidelines] Photographer's Note
The Australian Magpie (Cracticus tibicen) is a medium-sized black and white passerine bird native to Australia and southern New Guinea. A member of the Artamidae, it is closely related to the butcherbirds. At one stage, the Australian Magpie was considered to be three separate species, although zones of hybridisation between forms reinforced the idea of a single species with several subspecies, nine of which are now recognised. The adult Australian Magpie is a fairly robust bird ranging from 37–43 cm (14.5–17 in) in length, with distinctive black and white plumage, red eyes and a solid wedge-shaped bluish-white and black bill. The male and female are similar in appearance, and can be distinguished by differences in back markings. With its long legs, the Australian Magpie walks rather than waddles or hops and spends much time on the ground. This adaptation has led to some authorities maintaining it in its own genus Gymnorhina. Described as one of Australia's most accomplished songbirds, the Australian Magpie has an array of complex vocalisations.

The Australian Magpie is omnivorous, with the bulk of its varied diet made up of invertebrates. It is generally sedentary and territorial throughout its range. Common and widespread, it has adapted well to human habitation and is a familiar bird of parks, gardens and farmland in Australia and New Guinea. Magpies were introduced into New Zealand in the 1860s and are proving to be a pest by displacing native birds. Introductions also occurred in the Solomon Islands and Fiji, where these birds have not become invasive.

Spring in Australia is magpie season, when a small minority of breeding magpies (almost always males) around the country become aggressive and swoop and attack those who approach their nests, especially bike riders. This species is commonly fed by households around the country and is the mascot of several famous Australian sporting teams.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Only registered TrekNature members may rate photo notes.
Add Critique [Critiquing Guidelines] 
Only registered TrekNature members may write critiques.
Discussions
None
You must be logged in to start a discussion.

Critiques [Translate]

nice crow, TFS Ori

Calibration Check
















0123456789ABCDEF