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Rhea´s head


Rhea´s head
Photo Information
Copyright: Hernan Tolosa (saguzar) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 1095 W: 72 N: 1394] (7202)
Genre: Animals
Medium: Color
Date Taken: 2003-03-20
Categories: Birds
Exposure: f/11.6, 1/250 seconds
Photo Version: Original Version
Date Submitted: 2006-01-04 17:43
Viewed: 3120
Points: 2
[Note Guidelines] Photographer's Note
Class: Aves
Order: Struthioniformes
Family: Rheidae
Genus: Rhea
Species: Rhea americana

Rheas live in pampas, campos, cerrado and open chaco woodland of South America. They avoid open grassland. Rheas live in areas with at least some tall vegatation. During the breeding season, they stay near rivers, lakes, or marshes.
Their breeding season is from August to January, depending on the region. Males court two to twelve females. Once mating has occurred, the males build nests, which are shallow holes in the ground with a rim that is surrounded by twigs and vegatation. Each of the females lay one egg in the male's nest every other day for a period of seven to ten days. After the first two or three days of egg laying, the male stays with his nest and eggs and begins incubating them. A male usually incubates ten to sixty eggs. The chicks hatch within thirty-six hours of each other. The male takes care of the chicks by himself. Female rheas move from male to male throughout the breeding season.
Physical Description
Mass
23 kg (average)
(50.6 lbs)

Reproduction
Their breeding season is from August to January, depending on the region. Males court two to twelve females. Once mating has occurred, the males build nests, which are shallow holes in the ground with a rim that is surrounded by twigs and vegatation. Each of the females lay one egg in the male's nest every other day for a period of seven to ten days. After the first two or three days of egg laying, the male stays with his nest and eggs and begins incubating them. A male usually incubates ten to sixty eggs. The chicks hatch within thirty-six hours of each other. The male takes care of the chicks by himself. Female rheas move from male to male throughout the breeding season.

Behavior
During the spring, male rheas are solitary, and females form into small groups. Yearlings form a flock until they are two years old, which is when they are ready to breed. At the end of the summer males, females, and chicks come together to form large flocks for the winter months. The flocks formed after the breeding season contain twenty to thirty and sometimes as many as one hundred rheas.

Food Habits
Rheas are omnivorous, preferring broad-leaved plants and clover. However, they eat a variety of seeds, roots and fruits. They also eat insects, including grasshoppers; small vertebrates, such as lizards, frogs, small birds and snakes. Rheas continuously move as they feed.

Economic Importance for Humans: Negative
Rheas are a pest to farmers because they will eat almost any agricultural crop.

Economic Importance for Humans: Positive
Rhea feathers are used to make feather dusters in South America. Their skins are used for leather, their meat and eggs are consumed by man and dogs.




Data taken from: http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu
Photo: taken at La Plata zoo; the image shows a female rhea.


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Critiques [Translate]

Hi,
Excellent details!
Great perpective!
Ana:)

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