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Reptilia


Reptilia
Photo Information
Copyright: Enio Branco (Brutamonte) Silver Star Critiquer/Gold Note Writer [C: 18 W: 0 N: 92] (1202)
Genre: Animals
Medium: Color
Date Taken: 2009-04-23
Categories: Reptiles
Camera: Sony Cybershot DSC H50
Photo Version: Original Version
Date Submitted: 2009-06-08 5:04
Viewed: 4298
Points: 2
[Note Guidelines] Photographer's Note [Portuguese]
Lizards are a very large and widespread group of squamate reptiles, with nearly 5,000 species, ranging across all continents except Antarctica as well as most oceanic island chains. The group, traditionally recognized as the suborder Lacertilia, is defined as all extant members of the Lepidosauria (reptiles with overlapping scales) which are neither sphenodonts (i.e., Tuatara) nor snakes. While the snakes are recognized as falling phylogenetically within the anguimorph lizards from which they evolved, the sphenodonts are the sister group to the squamates, the larger monophyletic group which includes both the lizards and the snakes.

Lizards typically have limbs and external ears, while snakes lack both these characteristics. However, because they are defined negatively as excluding snakes, lizards have no unique distinguishing characteristic as a group. Lizards and snakes share a movable quadrate bone, distinguishing them from the sphenodonts which have a more primitive and solid diapsid skull. Many lizards can detach their tails in order to escape from predators, an act called autotomy, but this trait is not universal. Vision, including color vision, is particularly well developed in most lizards, and most communicate with body language or bright colors on their bodies as well as with pheromones. The adult length of species within the suborder ranges from a few centimeters for some chameleons and geckos to nearly three meters (9 feet, 6 inches) in the case of the largest living varanid lizard, the Komodo Dragon. Some extinct varanids reached great size. The extinct aquatic mosasaurs reached 17.5 meters, and the giant monitor Megalania prisca is estimated to have reached perhaps seven meters.


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Critiques [Translate]

Oi Enio,
Excelente foto, boa cor e uma abordagem que destaca a parte da frente do réptil, de modo que a imagem tem caráter e é muito impressionante. Excelentete composição cruz parovechando linha da árvore onde ele empoleirado réptil.

Saludos,

Jesús

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