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Eyes Wide Opened


Eyes Wide Opened
Photo Information
Copyright: Agoes SK (wieyos) Silver Star Critiquer/Silver Note Writer [C: 13 W: 0 N: 36] (127)
Genre: Animals
Medium: Color
Date Taken: 2008-04-22
Categories: Mammals
Camera: Pentax K20D, Pentax DA 50-200mm f/4-5.6 ED
Exposure: f/5.6, 1/4 seconds
More Photo Info: [view]
Photo Version: Original Version
Date Submitted: 2008-05-04 21:05
Viewed: 6507
Points: 8
[Note Guidelines] Photographer's Note
Hi Folks,

this is a tarsier, a small-sized primate with big eyes.

Tarsiers are prosimian primates of the genus Tarsius, a monotypic genus in the family Tarsiidae, which is itself the lone extant family within the infraorder Tarsiiformes. Although the group was once more widespread, all the species living today are found in the islands of South East Asia.

Tarsiers are small animals with enormous eyes and very long hind limbs. Their feet have extremely elongated tarsus bones, from which the animals get their name.

The head and body range from 10 to 15 cm in length, but the hind limbs are about twice this long (including the feet), and they also have a slender tail from 20 to 25 cm long.

Their fingers are also elongated, with the third finger being about the same length as the upper arm. Most of the digits have nails, but the second and third toes of the hind feet bear claws instead, which are used for grooming. Tarsiers have very soft, velvety fur, which is generally buff, beige, or ochre in color.

Unlike other prosimians, tarsiers have no tooth-comb, and their dental formula is also unique.

All tarsier species are nocturnal in their habits, but like many nocturnal organisms some individuals may show more or less activity during the daytime. Unlike many nocturnal animals, however, tarsiers lack a light-reflecting area
(tapetum lucidum) of the eye. They also have a fovea, atypical for nocturnal animals.

The tarsier brain is different from other primates in terms of the arrangement of the connections between the two eyes and the lateral geniculate nucleus, which is the main region of the thalamus that receives visual information.

The sequence of cellular layers receiving information from the ipsilateral (same side of the head) and contralateral (opposite side of the head) eyes in the lateral geniculate nucleus distinguishes tarsiers from lemurs, lorises, and monkeys, which are all similar in this respect.

Some neuroscientists suggested that "this apparent difference distinguishes tarsiers from all other primates, reinforcing the view that they arose in an early, independent line of primate evolution".

They are primarily insectivorous, and catch insects by jumping at them. They are also known to prey on small vertebrates, such as birds, snakes, lizards, and bats. As they jump from tree to tree, tarsiers can catch even birds in motion.

Gestation takes about six months, and tarsiers give birth to single offspring. Young tarsiers are born furred, and with open eyes, and are able to climb within a day of birth. They reach sexual maturity after one year. Adults live in pairs, with a home range of around one hectare.


Thanks for viewing
Agoes

gracious, marhowie, PaulGana has marked this note useful
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Critiques [Translate]

Hello Agoes,
Aba Khabar!
many thanks for sharing this fine and beautiful image of Tarsier!
the image is so sharp with wonderful colour and superb details in the shot
well done and many thanks for the useful notes
terima kasih
Tony

nice find and good shot, strange looking little guy

amazing face, TFS Ori

  • Great 
  • Tabib Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Note Writer [C: 160 W: 5 N: 167] (859)
  • [2008-08-26 1:14]

Hi Agoes!

Very good finding.
Look like its wearing a spectackes with reflexion of leaves on it.
TFS,
/redzlan/.

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