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toco toucan


toco toucan
Photo Information
Copyright: Heike Nagel (Nagel) (8)
Genre: Animals
Medium: Color
Date Taken: 2008-07-22
Categories: Birds
Camera: Polaroid i633
Exposure: f/2.8
More Photo Info: [view]
Photo Version: Original Version
Date Submitted: 2008-07-23 3:41
Viewed: 3557
Points: 0
[Note Guidelines] Photographer's Note
I took this photo of the impressive bird in a bird sanctuary in Walsrode, northern Germany. The sanctuary shows a huge variety of birds and is said to be the biggest of its kind worldwide. Many birds are bred there in order to keep up a high population and / or return them to the wild.
Now to the toucan:
The Toco Toucan (Ramphastos toco) is the largest and arguably best known species in the toucan family. It is found in semi-open habitats throughout a large part of central and eastern South America. It is a common attraction in zoos.
It occurs in northern and eastern Bolivia, extreme south-eastern Peru, northern Argentina, eastern and central Paraguay, eastern and southern Brazil (excluding southern Rio Grande do Sul, the dry regions dominated by Caatinga vegetation and coastal regions between Ceará and Rio de Janeiro). Other disjunct populations occur along the lower Amazon River (Ilha de Marajo west approximately to the Madeira River), far northern Brazil in Roraima, and coastal regions of the Guianas. It only penetrates the Amazon in relatively open areas (e.g. along river corridors). It is resident, but local movements may occur.
The Toco Toucan eats fruit (e.g. figs and Passiflora edulis) using its bill to pluck them from trees, but also insects, and nestlings and eggs of birds. It also has been known to capture and eat small adult birds in captivity. The long bill is useful for reaching things that otherwise would be out-of-reach. It is also used to skin fruit and scare off predators.[3] It is typically seen in pairs or small groups. In flight it alternates between a burst of rapid flaps with the relatively short, rounded wings and gliding. Nesting is seasonal, but timing differs between regions. The nest is typically placed high in a tree and consists of a cavity, at least part of which is excavated by the parent birds themselves. It has also been recorded nesting in holes in earth-banks and terrestrial termite-nests. Their reproduction cycle is annual. The female usually lays two to four eggs a few days after mating. The eggs are incubated by both sexes and hatch after 17-18 days. These birds are very protective of themselves and of their babies. (excerpt taken from wikipedia)

;-) somehow I'd love to have a Guinness now... ;-))
any critiques and comments welcome.
regards, Heike


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