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Episyrphus balteatus (female)


Episyrphus balteatus (female)
Photo Information
Copyright: Anghel Eliz (eliz) Gold Star Critiquer/Silver Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 167 W: 20 N: 271] (1537)
Genre: Animals
Medium: Color
Date Taken: 2008-08
Categories: Insects
Camera: Canon EOS 400D, Pentacon 50/1.8, RAW ISO 200, Extension Tube
Exposure: f/5.6, 1/50 seconds
Photo Version: Original Version
Theme(s): My Insects [view contributor(s)]
Date Submitted: 2008-09-11 14:33
Viewed: 3238
Points: 6
[Note Guidelines] Photographer's Note
@later edit 2: i think this is a female. according to this article male don't have space between the eyes:
http://www.microscopy-uk.org.uk/mag/artmay07/cd-hoverflies.html
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@later edit:
Hoverfly family, not sure about the species yet.

FAMILY INFO:
Flies in the Diptera family Syrphidae are commonly known as hoverflies, flower flies, or Syrphid flies.

As their common names suggest, they are often seen hovering or nectaring at flowers; the adults of many species feed mainly on nectar and pollen, while the larvae (maggots) eat a wide range of foods. In some species, the larvae are saprotrophs, eating decaying plant and animal matter in the soil or in ponds and streams. In other species, the larvae are insectivores and prey on aphids, thrips, and other plant-sucking insects.

Aphids alone cause tens of millions of dollars of damage to crops worldwide every year; because of this, aphid-feeding hoverflies are being recognized as important natural enemies of pests, and potential agents for use in biological control. Some adult syrphid flies are important pollinators.

About 6,000 species in 200 genera have been described. Hoverflies are common throughout the world and can be found on every continent except Antarctica. Hoverflies are harmless despite their mimicry of the black and yellow stripes of wasps, which act to ward off predators.

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@original post: I don't know what species it is but i will investigate.
I saw this species a few times. I think it`s a common species.

http://www.treknature.com/gallery/Europe/Romania/East/Brasov/Zarnesti/photo165754.htm

I shoot this in exactly the same place as 'cicindela' (Prapastiile Zarnestilor).

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Critiques [Translate]

Hi Anghel,
Splendid capture of this hoverfly, an Episyrphus balteatus for me. Nice details and mild background. The face is very well captured. Good job,
Catherine

Hello Anghel
This hoverfly is missing its right hind leg. You got good focus on the body parts and the face and the out of focus wings is supposedly because of movement versus the slow shutter speed. The pink and green colours in the background formed a lovely variation to the orange colours of the fly. Rehanna.

Hi Anghel,
Nice macro with vivid colours.
Great details and nice BG.
Kind regards
Saeed

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