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Robin


Robin
Photo Information
Copyright: Tom Peak (tkp1165) Gold Star Critiquer/Silver Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 156 W: 12 N: 595] (3876)
Genre: Animals
Medium: Color
Date Taken: 2009-04-06
Categories: Birds
Camera: Nikon D 80, Sigma 50-500mm f4-6.3 DG EX APO HSM
Exposure: f/8, 1/320 seconds
Details: Tripod: Yes
More Photo Info: [view]
Photo Version: Original Version
Date Submitted: 2009-04-07 13:10
Viewed: 2738
Points: 6
[Note Guidelines] Photographer's Note
This is anouther shot of the Robins from the park the other day. Thanks for looking.

The American Robin (Turdus migratorius, also called North American Robin) is a migratory songbird of the thrush family. It is named after the European Robin because of the male's bright red breast, though the two species are not closely related. The American Robin is widely distributed throughout North America, wintering south of Canada from Florida to central Mexico and along the Pacific Coast. It is the state bird of Connecticut, Michigan and Wisconsin. It has seven subspecies, but only T. m. confinis in the southwest is particularly distinctive, with pale gray-brown underparts.

The American Robin is active mostly during the day and assembles in large flocks at night. Its diet consists of invertebrates (such as beetle grubs and caterpillars), fruits and berries. It is one of the first bird species to lay eggs, beginning to breed shortly after returning to its summer range from its winter range. Its nest consists of long coarse grass, twigs, paper, and feathers, and is smeared with mud and often cushioned with grass or other soft materials. It is among the first birds to sing at dawn, and its song consists of several discrete units that are repeated.

The adult robin is preyed upon by hawks, cats and larger snakes, but when feeding in flocks it is able to be vigilant and watch other birds for reactions to predators. Brood parasitism by the Brown-headed Cowbird occurs, but is rare because the robin usually rejects the cowbird eggs.

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Critiques [Translate]

  • Great 
  • tuslaw Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 2754 W: 282 N: 4931] (19883)
  • [2009-04-07 18:22]

Hello Tom,
I believe I like this shot even more then the first, because you can see the beautiful plumage at a much better angle. Great detail, composition and wonderful natural colors!! TFS.
Ron

  • Great 
  • zetu Gold Star Critiquer/Silver Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 967 W: 26 N: 3888] (16941)
  • [2009-04-07 21:17]

Hello Tom
Good work with this bird, you capture it with wonderful colors, good light and great details.
Regards
Razvan

  • Great 
  • crs Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Note Writer [C: 469 W: 0 N: 922] (3551)
  • [2009-04-07 21:34]

Hello Tom,

At your previous post, after entering my comments, I saw I was out of smilyes. Therefore I was unable to send you the smily.

In this photo you have the same good low pov and a very fine light. The plumage is shown in very nice color tones. Sharpness is excelent showing very fine details of the bird. You have used very well the DOF isolating the main subject from fore and background and creating a fine 3D effect.

Thank you for sharing,
Cristian

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