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Gibbon; for Goldy


Gibbon; for Goldy
Photo Information
Copyright: Subhash Ranjan (sranjan) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 489 W: 63 N: 1877] (5784)
Genre: Animals
Medium: Color
Date Taken: 2009-08-26
Categories: Mammals
Camera: Nikon D-200, Tamron SP AF200-500mm f5-6.3 Di LD
Photo Version: Original Version
Theme(s): Goldys' Personal Favorites [view contributor(s)]
Date Submitted: 2009-09-29 10:59
Viewed: 6638
Favorites: 1 [view]
Points: 4
[Note Guidelines] Photographer's Note
I shot this gibbon at National Zoological Garden, Delhi.

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Gibbons are apes in the family Hylobatidae. The family is divided into four genera based on their diploid chromosome number: Hylobates (44), Hoolock (38), Nomascus (52), and Symphalangus (50). The extinct Bunopithecus sericus is a gibbon or gibbon-like ape which, until recently, was thought to be closely related to the Hoolock gibbons. Gibbons occur in tropical and subtropical rainforests from northeast India to Indonesia and north to southern China, including the islands of Sumatra, Borneo and Java.

Also called the lesser apes, gibbons differ from great apes (chimpanzees, bonobos, gorillas, orangutans and humans) in being smaller and (other than most humans) pair-bonded, in not making nests, and in certain anatomical details in which they superficially more closely resemble monkeys than great apes do. Gibbons are masters of their primary mode of locomotion, brachiation, swinging from branch to branch for distances of up to 15 m (50 ft), at speeds as high as 56 km/h (35 mph). They can also make leaps of up to 8 m (27 ft), and walk bipedally with their arms raised for balance. They are the fastest and most agile of all tree-dwelling, non-flying mammals.

Depending on species and gender, gibbons' fur coloration varies from dark to light brown shades, and anywhere in between black and white. It is rare to see a completely white gibbon.

Source: wikipedia

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Critiques [Translate]

I really am pleasantly surprised, my dear friend Ranjan!
Thanks much for this kind dedication.
As a general rule, I oppose the caging of wild animals.
But Gibbons are nowhere to be found in North India, so I guess for education and awareness purposes, it makes some sense to have a few in the zoos.
A lovely shot, timed perfectly well.
Thanks once again!
Goldy

hello Subhash

excellent photo of this species of monkey the Gibbon,
fine frontal POV, the photo shot at the good moment,
with fine focus excellent sharpness and details, TFS

Asbed

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