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Honey finder


Honey finder
Photo Information
Copyright: Arindam Mitra (arindammitra89) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Note Writer [C: 52 W: 0 N: 137] (918)
Genre: Animals
Medium: Color
Date Taken: 2011-06-09
Categories: Insects
Exposure: f/5.6, 1/200 seconds
More Photo Info: [view]
Photo Version: Original Version
Date Submitted: 2011-07-23 4:33
Viewed: 2565
Points: 10
[Note Guidelines] Photographer's Note
Bees are flying insects closely related to wasps and ants, and are known for their role in pollination and for producing honey and beeswax. Bees are a monophyletic lineage within the superfamily Apoidea, presently classified by the unranked taxon name Anthophila. There are nearly 20,000 known species of bees in seven to nine recognized families,[1] though many are undescribed and the actual number is probably higher. They are found on every continent except Antarctica, in every habitat on the planet that contains insect-pollinated flowering plants.
Bees are adapted for feeding on nectar and pollen, the former primarily as an energy source and the latter primarily for protein and other nutrients. Most pollen is used as food for larvae.
Bees have a long proboscis (a complex "tongue") that enables them to obtain the nectar from flowers. They have antennae almost universally made up of 13 segments in males and 12 in females, as is typical for the superfamily. Bees all have two pairs of wings, the hind pair being the smaller of the two; in a very few species, one sex or caste has relatively short wings that make flight difficult or impossible, but none are wingless.
The smallest bee is Trigona minima, a stingless bee whose workers are about 2.1 mm (5/64") long. The largest bee in the world is Megachile pluto, a leafcutter bee whose females can attain a length of 39 mm (1.5"). Members of the family Halictidae, or sweat bees, are the most common type of bee in the Northern Hemisphere, though they are small and often mistaken for wasps or flies.
The best-known bee species is the European honey bee, which, as its name suggests, produces honey, as do a few other types of bee. Human management of this species is known as beekeeping or apiculture.
Bees are the favorite meal of Merops apiaster, the bee-eater bird. Other common predators are kingbirds, mockingbirds, beewolves, and dragonflies.

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Critiques [Translate]

Ciao Arindam, lovely composition with beatiful bee, splendid light, wonderful natural colors, fine details and exsellent sharpness, very well done, my friend, have a good week end, ciao Silvio

  • Great 
  • siggi Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 3097 W: 109 N: 12399] (52850)
  • [2011-07-23 6:20]

Hello Arindam.
Very good picture of this wasp. Colors and the details on the insect are very good! Great picture.
Best regards Siggi

Hi Arindam,

Splendid capture of this Wasp, good sharpness in the right area's, lovely colours, good work Arindam and well done,
Best regards,

Pauly.

Hi Arindam,
Excellent composition of this wasp. I like the shallow DOF which puts the emphasise on your focus point. Well done.
Regards,
Carl

Arindam,
Post some new picture.
this also nice. waiting for a new picture.
best wishes.
samiran

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