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A question about sharpening etc LordPotty Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 1381 W: 144 N: 3872] (12503)::2008-09-06 3:59
I think I'm doing something wrong in the editing process.
I find it hard to get a sharp resized image without oversharpening,and getting the dreaded 'ghost' outline that results.
Usually,I adjust the gamma correction,and sometimes the hue first.
Then I crop and sharpen the image.
After resizing (or resampling) for the web,the image often appears to soft still,so I sharpen again
.... then it looks oversharpened.
(I mostly use Irfanview which doesn't have a fine adjustment for sharpening)I have Photofiltre and a trial version of Photoshop CS2 but find Photoshop difficult to use.
This problem has been frustrating me for some time so could someone please explain for me the correct procedure in the correct order?
Thank you,
Steve
Re: A question about sharpening etc joey Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 1739 W: 224 N: 6872] (24909)::2008-09-06 4:07
Hi Steve,
here's what I do:

Open the image, crop it and do all the noise reduction, levels, curves, saturation etc first. Then I use un-sharp mask in CS3 (CS2 has it as well), just enough to bring out the detail slightly and crisp up the edges. Then I add a frame.
Next I resize to the TN limits and and do a bit more sharpening (but only a small amount).
Usually there's still a bit of graininess in the BG so I duplicate the layer, do a bit of noise reduction, add a "Hide All" Layer Mask and then paint over the BG to reduce the noise only in the BG.
Then I sign it and save.

I hope this is some help.

Joe
Re: A question about sharpening etc LordPotty Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 1381 W: 144 N: 3872] (12503)::2008-09-06 6:06
Thanks Joe,
I'll try doing it that way & see how I go.

Cheers
Steve
Re: A question about sharpening etc SunToucher Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 2385 W: 237 N: 3033] (11162)::2008-09-06 9:54
Steve,
This is going to different from Joey. First do all you adjustments in the large possible file (which is obvious the larger the file the more data available) For me thats TIFF 16-bit. Then sharpen your photo and after that re-size it for TN. Then sharpen it again but with a lower input.

Niek
Re: A question about sharpening etc elizabeth Gold Star Critiquer [C: 69 W: 41 N: 1] (10)::2008-09-06 13:00
Hi Steve

Another real basic sharpening method (in PS); AFTER resizing (I never sharpen my original file, just my resized files as sharpening twice accentuates noise and degrades the image) I sharpen using the Sharpen Filter then use Fade Sharpen and adjust the percentage until it looks good. This is a lazy but still effective way of sharpening those images for the web. For more control I would use Unsharp Mask.

Another way (and which helps keep the noise down) is to duplicate the layer, apply a High Pass Filter to it with the pixel radius usually set between 5 - 12 (depending on the image size) then blend with the first laying using either Overlay, Soft Light or Hard Light (depending on how you want it to look), then alter the transparency of that layer till the image looks the way you want it. The best thing about this method is you can just delete the layer if it didn't work and you are back to your original unsharpened layer. Flatten the layers once you are happy with it. (These instructions were in one of our club newsletters earlier this year).

Cheers
Elizabeth
Re: A question about sharpening etc robindb Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Note Writer [C: 127 W: 0 N: 378] (1420)::2008-09-10 20:42
Hi Steve,

The advice I have received and what I have learnt on training courses is that all adjustments must be done first before sharpening. If you re-size after sharpening you destroy parts of the sharpening data. If you then re-sharpen you can pick up problems. Then also rather under-sharpen than over-sharpen so if you see the slightest hint of a halo bring the sharpening amount down.

Robin
Re: A question about sharpening etc LordPotty Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 1381 W: 144 N: 3872] (12503)::2008-09-10 20:50
Gosh .... eveyone is saying different things.
How confusing !
I guess I'll try have to apply each of the different methods to the same photo and compare results.
(the photoshop stuff sounds awfully technical to me though)
hmmmm
Thanks for all your input anyway :)
Cheers
Steve
Re: A question about sharpening etc Wuud52 (10)::2009-01-28 14:03
Sounds like I am hearing 1 common theme; "Sharpen as close to submission as possible".

Also, I do not know if you have access to Adobe Lightroom, but it lets you do selective sharpening with a paint brush tool. You can just do an eye and some feathers on a bird, and leave the rest.

As for free tools, Picasa, by Google, listened to its users and created a slide bar for its sharpening. You can now adjust for more or less, although it is universal.
Re: A question about sharpening etc amanengone Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 188 W: 54 N: 412] (2113)::2009-06-18 6:33
Hello Steve.

Maybe could you have valuable reply here :

http://www.microsoft.com/israel/windowsxp/using/digitalphotography/learnmore/sharpening.mspx

and there :

http://www.microsoft.com/prophoto/downloads/default.aspx

All the best.

Philippe
Re: A question about sharpening etc LordPotty Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 1381 W: 144 N: 3872] (12503)::2009-06-18 16:28
Thank you Philippe,
I don't have Photoshop anymore so my options for editing are a bit more limited.
I've moved on from Irfanview to using Photofiltre but that still doesn't have a fine adjustment for sharpening.
I'm going to try the GIMP out too and see how it goes.
Cheers
Steve
Re: A question about sharpening etc amanengone Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 188 W: 54 N: 412] (2113)::2009-06-18 16:40
Hello Steve,

I recommend you GIMP : excellent software, quite as powerfull than Photoshop, free and no more difficult than Photoshop. For the sharpness, the idea are the same than with photoshop. In GIMP, you will find all the filters and procedures to improve you shots (including sharpness improvement).

All the best.

Philippe