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Inspector Gibbon : Gogo gadget arms !


Inspector Gibbon : Gogo gadget arms !
Photo Information
Copyright: Fred Hardaway (Deon01) Silver Star Critiquer/Silver Note Writer [C: 18 W: 1 N: 27] (159)
Genre: Animals
Medium: Color
Date Taken: 2005-08-02
Categories: Mammals
Camera: Canon 350D, Canon EF 55-200mm 4.5-5.6 II USM, SanDisk Ultra-II 1Gb
Exposure: f/5.6, 1/125 seconds
More Photo Info: [view]
Photo Version: Original Version
Date Submitted: 2006-05-09 3:43
Viewed: 20245
Points: 2
[Note Guidelines] Photographer's Note [French]
Gibbons are classified in the Kingdom Animalia, Phylum Chordata, Subphylum Vertebrata, Class Mammalia, Order Primates, Superfamily Hominoidea (Gray, 1825) and Family Hylobatidae.

Gibbons are small, arboreal apes distributed in the wild in the tropical and subtropical rainforests of Southeast Asia. They are currently found in small populations in China.

Gibbons have long fascinated scientists and lay people because of their agility in the forest tree tops. Gibbons are excellent brachiators (arm-swingers), and this is one reason they make popular zoo exhibits. In the wild, gibbons live in nuclear families consisting of a mated pair and their dependent offspring. The family unit occupies a territory, and they defend its boundaries by a vigorous vocal and visual display.

Native to the dwindling rain forests of Southeast Asia, gibbons are arboreal and considered to be among the world's greatest acrobats. They have the ability to swing from tree to tree distances of 50 feet, at speeds of up to 35 mph, while in trees 200 feet above the ground. This mode of locomotion--swinging under branches while suspended by their hands--is called brachiating. Gibbons are one of the few monogamous primates, and whether on the ground or in the trees, they are known for their dexterity and ability to walk upright. Often referred to as the "songbirds" of the primate family and the most musical land mammal, gibbons can project their voices up to 2 miles through the dense rainforest canopy. Unfortunately, their natural habitat is being destroyed at the alarming rate of 32 acres per minute! This destruction shall guarantee the disappearance of their melodious songs as well.

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Let me be the first to step up and say, this one is great! Love the POV & composition, good DOF & color. Not to mention he's hilarious. TFS! Randy

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