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Guineafowl (51)
Noisette Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Note Writer [C: 1714 W: 4 N: 2351] (7821)
hello All

this sunday i was with friends in " parc animalier de Sainte-Croix", this park is not a zoo, each species have a large territory in their natural habitat, it was founded from a great nature lover and his wife, the only problem is, sometimes the animals are on the other end of the territory and are not visible, or only from far

the most of the animals are or was from our region and a few are imported species

in this parc is also a farm with domestical animals like donkeys, pigs, sheeps and also goats for the great pleasure of the children who can going into their enclosure to caress them

my next posts are all taken in this park, i hope you will like them, all are not perfect, it was a sunny but cloudy day, it was difficult to adjust the camera between the light and the shadow and also the POV was not always perfect

i had preferd not to have the other birds in the BG but it was imossible to do

Helmeted Guineafowl

The Helmeted Guineafowl (Numida meleagris) is the best known of the guineafowl bird family, Numididae, and the only member of the genus Numida. It breeds in Africa, mainly south of the Sahara, and has been widely introduced into the West Indies and southern France.
It breeds in warm, fairly dry and open habitats with scattered shrubs and trees such as savanna or farmland. The nest is a well-hidden, generally unlined scrape and a clutch is normally 6-12 eggs which the female incubates for 26-28 days. Nests containing larger numbers of eggs are generally believed to be the result of more than one hen using the nest; eggs are large and an incubating bird could not realistically cover significantly more than a normal clutch. Domestic birds at least, are notable for producing extremely thick-shelled eggs that are reduced to fragments as the chicks hatch, rather than leaving two large sections and small chips from where any chick has removed the end of the egg. The chicks are cryptically coloured and rapid wing growth enables them to flutter onto low branches barely a week after hatching. These guineafowl live as long as 12 years in the wild.

The Helmeted Guineafowl is a large (53-58 cm) bird with a round body and small head. They weigh about 1.3 kg. The body plumage is gray-black spangled with white. Like other guineafowl, this species has an unfeathered head, in this case decorated with a dull yellow or reddish bony knob, and red and blue patches of skin. The wings are short and rounded, and the tail is also short. Various sub-species are proposed, differences in appearance being mostly a large variation in shape, size and colour of the casque and facial wattles.

This is a gregarious species, forming flocks outside the breeding season typically of about 25 birds that also roost communally. Guineafowl are particularly well-suited to consuming massive quantities of ticks, which might otherwise spread lyme disease. These birds are terrestrial, and prone to run rather than fly when alarmed. Like most gallinaceous birds, they have a short-lived explosive flight and rely on gliding to cover extended distances. Helmeted Guineafowl are great runners, and can walk 10 km and more in a day. They make loud harsh calls when disturbed. Their diet consists of a variety of animal and plant food; seeds, fruits, greens, snails, spiders, worms and insects, frogs, lizards, small snakes and small mammals. Guineafowl are equipped with strong claws and scratch in loose soil for food much like domestic chickens, although they seldom uproot growing plants in so doing. As with all of the numididae, they have no spurs.

In the early days of the European colonisation of North America, the native Wild Turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) was confused with this species. This led to the English name of the American bird, since Turkey and Guinea were equally far-off and exotic places. The word meleagris, Greek for guineafowl, is also shared in the scientific names of the two species, although for the guineafowl it is the species name, whereas for the turkey, it is the name of the genus and (in an altered state) the family.

Domestication

Helmeted Guineafowl is often domesticated, and it is this species that is sold in Western supermarkets.

Altered Image #1

Noisette Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Note Writer [C: 1714 W: 4 N: 2351] (7821)
Cropped & clonned.
Edited by:oscarromulus Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Workshop Editor/Silver Note Writer [C: 1437 W: 223 N: 11] (42)

Will do a fast job on the W/S today; have to visit my sister-in-law.
But you will get the idea. If you want I can re-fine the W/S tomorrow.