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Rosalie des Carpates. (42)
peter_stoeckl Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 1738 W: 291 N: 4005] (11530)
Rosalia alpina (Linnaeus, 1758)

Rosalia longicorn, Alpenbock, Rosalie des Alps, Havasi cincér, Алпийска розалия, …

Family: Cerambycidae

Body length: 15 – 38mm

Probably one of the most picturesque of European beetles, blue white and black Rosalia longicorn is a rare inhabitant of mountain beech forests. In constant decline and already extinct in many parts of Europe, there are a few isolated populations in the French Pyrennees, the Cevennes, in Italy, in Switzerland, Austria, Bavaria, Slovakia, Poland, Hungary, southeastern Europe, the Caucasus.

Its larvae feed on decaying beech wood, and the beetle is therefore depending on forests with enough dead wood left behind. It prefers damaged trees standing alone or at the edge of forests at sunny locations. The limestone mountains of southern Romania near the Danube seem to be a paradise for them with their large primordial beech forests interrupted by wide sunny clearings for large herds of sheep.

Of course, the area is a paradise for hikers who enjoy wide and lonely unspoilt places, as well.

The beetles may be found from June to August. They are reported to have a short life span of just about 10 days, making the beetle even rarer to be seen at all. This one here was discovered caught in a spider web at a lonesome forest clearing near the top of Varfu lui Stan mountain.

Location:
Varfu lui stan, Cerna valley near Baile Herculane, at an elevation of 1200m.

Literature:
Karl Wilhelm Harde, Frantisek Severa: Der Kosmos Käferführer. Die Käfer Mitteleuropas, Stuttgart 1981/2006

The camera:
SONY DSC-HX1, 3456 x 2592 pixels, sRGB, 14mm macro zoom (equivalent 82 mm at full size SLR), F/4, 1/1000sec., ISO-125, bias: -0.3, hand held, fill flash. 23.08.2010, 11.06.

Slightly cropped, levels adjusted, partially resharpened after downsize for web (Photoshop CS4).

Thank you. Have a nice weekend!

***

Some of my friends asked me if I was able to free that precious beetle trapped in a spider web: Yes, I was. But the beetle turned out to be stiff and dead already. It was already gone to heaven, so to say.

So, in order to cheer you up a little bit, I am adding another picture of the Alpine longicorn: a lively couple seen passionately in love last summer on a hot sunny day at at high noon in the Vienna Woods.

Austria: Alpine longicorns in love.

Enjoy.

Altered Image #1

peter_stoeckl Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 1738 W: 291 N: 4005] (11530)
Tales from the Vienna Woods.
Edited by:peter_stoeckl Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 1738 W: 291 N: 4005] (11530)

Some of my friends asked me if I was able to free that precious beetle trapped in a spider web: Yes, I was. But the beetle that seemed to be moving gently in the breeze turned out to be stiff and dead already. It was already gone to heaven, so to say.

So, in order to cheer you up a little bit, I am adding this lively couple of Alpine longicorns seen passionately in love last summer on a hot sunny day at at high noon in the Vienna Woods - Location: Höllenstein, Kaltenleutgeben, 600m above sea level. Not a frequent sight there, either, but an encouraging proof that the species might recover again in a few places where much care is taken in protecting nature. The Vienna Woods embracing the city of Vienna in the west have been declared a protected area just a few years ago (Biosphärenpark Wienerwald).

SONY DSC-HX1, 3456 x 2592 pixels, sRGB, 14mm macro zoom (equivalent 82 mm at full size SLR), F/8, 1/250sec., ISO-125, bias: -0.3, hand held, no flash. 26.07.2009, 12:31. Cropped, levels adjusted, CS4.

Hope you enjoy.