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meyerd Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 585 W: 64 N: 2238] (7531)
From the backyard:

I am pleased to present you the 7 mm long progeny of the wasp I was observing laying eggs, the very wasp I had shown you before on TN: the larvae of the Black Rose Sawfly (Hymenoptera; Symphyta; Argidae; Arge pagana (Panzer); Blauschwarze Bürstenhorn-Blattwespe; Hilotome noir et jaune). The larvae eat the leaves of Wild rose, sticking together as a family. They even synchronize their behaviour! When disturbed, they lift their abdomen into the air, all at the same time (see here). How does such behaviour profit the animals? My guess is that synchronized movements might suggest a huge "monster" to a predator.

These larvae resemble caterpillars but there is only the first abdominal segment, not the two first like in caterpillars that lack abdominal legs.

Altered Image #1

meyerd Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 585 W: 64 N: 2238] (7531)
Same crew, same show
Edited by:meyerd Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 585 W: 64 N: 2238] (7531)

Same crew, same show:
All I id was touching the leaf with my finger: up went all the abdomens in concert. Impressive!
Dietrich